Monday Blues – August 15, 2016

The only thing blue about this Monday was my high heel shoe color! I learned so much (see below) and was able to meet for my first coaching appointment. Thank you, “anonymous teacher whose name I know but will keep private for confidentiality” for your referral! The big question of the day today was:

How can you organize Google Drive folders?

The answer is: very carefully!

I tried this today and I learned several things that may be helpful to you if you are going to do this in your classroom.

1. It takes a lot longer than you would think to have students organize their Google Drives.
2. There are a lot more steps than you think to doing this.
3. Students have trouble following directions, even if the steps are displayed in print on the board and then demonstrated on the projector.
4. If you don’t like the format in which you had them name their folders, just wait until next year for another opportunity to start fresh, because it is waaaaay too much work to rename them or have students rename them.

1. It takes a lot longer than you would think to have students organize their Google Drives.

The problem is that each student is in a different place when it comes to working on their Chromebooks. Some already had their folders created with work for the different classes organized neatly inside different folders within their class folders, and some didn’t know how to log in to Google Classroom. In their defense, Haiku is the school’s preferred LMS, so they might have some experience with Haiku. However, I did post on the home page in Haiku to go to Google Classroom for the assignments. Having students organize their Google Drives might take 5 minutes, or it might take 50 minutes. Plan accordingly.

2. There are a lot more steps than you think to do this. Examples:

Turn on the computer.
(My computer isn’t charged. 
I forgot my computer.
I can’t log in.)

Log in to the computer.
(My Internet isn’t working.
I forgot my password.)

Log in with the District account.
(I just used the same password and it didn’t work.
Do I have to type my name or the whole address?)

Open, then sign into Chrome (if desired.)
(How do I get to Chrome?
Why should I sign into the browser?
What is Chrome, anyway?)

Go to your Google Drive.
(Where is Google Drive?
I think I lost my Google Drive.
There is no shortcut on the desktop.)

Create a folder for each of your classes.
(How do I create a folder?
Do I have to make one for P.E./art/T.A./soccer/band/etc.?)
My teacher said we’re not using the Chromebooks in that class.)

And this is all before setting the sharing permissions and testing it out!

3. Students have trouble following directions, even if the steps are displayed in print on the board and then demonstrated on the projector.

You may want to forget about your guilt over killing the trees for a moment and think of how useful the tree will be when it has directions printed out for students to reference instantly. And how much time you will save by simply directing them to the sheet: “Have you completed step 5 yet? Then read step 6.”) I would still display the steps and demonstrate them on the projector, but some students will also need to refet to the sheet if they feel left behind.

4. If you don’t like the format in which you had them name their folders, just wait until next year for another opportunity to start fresh, because it is waaaaay too much work to rename them or have students rename them.

Format for naming folders:

LAST name, First name, teacher, class, period, school year
(Hernandez Jose – Collins – Eng 10 – Per. 1 – 2016-17)

Learn from me, young grasshopper, and d0 not name them: “Eng 10 – Collins – Per. 1”  because students’ names are not displayed in some views and now I have 36 folders called Eng 10 – Collins in period 1 instead of their last names to easily navigate their work.

Format for naming files:

LAST name, first name, assignment, teacher, period
(Hernandez Jose – Summer Assignment – Collins – Per. 1)

or, do as I read once online, and have them number all assignments. (If you are the organized type, which I am not.)

The students will get confused about folders and files. They will upload the wrong things and call them the wrong names. They will send you the things you don’t want and will put items in their folders that you wanted them to turn in. They will think they turned something in just because they put it in a shared folder but did not notify you that they completed the assignment.

I am giving this Google Classroom thing a try, but as you can see it is a little confusing for a newbie, and maybe for my students, too. But I will carry on and move forward, because “grit.”

***********************************************************************

Here are the notes from our meeting today, provided with permission from the teacher whom I met and given to him or her to keep for reference. We worked on organizing the first unit, Argument, for a high-school level class. 

8 15 16 meeting

Below is a sample ACR chart that I created on the spot for the teacher. (Please don’t judge my argument skills on the lame reasons I put below.) This is my go-to organizer for argumentative writing, adapted from Step Up to Writing.

ACR Chart

I hope these insights are helpful to you. Please email me on district email or at my personal account: warriorcollins@gmail.com, or DM me on Twitter @coachcollins951 if you have further questions or additional ideas.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: